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Spotlight

Greenhouse at the Parkwood Estate National Historic Site. Parkwood Estate National Historic Site: Greenhouse Conservation

Oshawa’s Parkwood Estate was erected in 1915 as the home of automotive industrialist Colonel Sam McLaughlin, who had a keen interest in horticulture. Designed by the leading establishment architecture firm Darling & Pearson, the estate included five greenhouses, with additional greenhouses added over time. The estate is now a National Historic Site. After the property...

exterior view of new addition to NAC National Arts Centre

Situated in the heart of the nation’s capital on Confederation Square, Ottawa’s National Arts Centre (NAC) displays a robust Brutalist geometric form, evoking the image of a fortress for the arts. Built between 1964 and 1969 as one of the federal government’s centennial projects, the NAC was designed by Fred Lebensold of the Montreal-based architecture...

St. James’ Cathedral Centre

St. James’ Parish House, as it was originally known, is an important piece of the St. James’ Cathedral campus, one of the defining historical properties of Toronto’s old town. The Parish House, completed in 1909, was designed by well-known Toronto architects Darling and Pearson, and is an excellent example of Neo-Gothic style. The Diocesan Centre, adjoined...

Trinity Bellwoods Gates

Trinity Bellwoods Park was formerly part of a large swath of military reserve around the nascent Town of York, founded in 1791. In 1851, Bishop John Strachan purchased the land as the site for the original Trinity College. This building was completed in 1852, and all that remains of it are the gates we see...

La Cour d’appel du Québec (Quebec Court of Appeals)

This monumental building in Old Montreal, completed in 1926, was designed by Ernest Cormier, Louis-Auguste Amos, and Charles J. Saxe. Cormier, known for his fine design work and decidedly modern approach to architecture, also designed l’Université de Montréal; St. Michael’s College School, Toronto; the Supreme Court of Canada, Ottawa; and Cormier House, which served fo several...

Illustration of 19 Dundas Square Hermant Building: 19 Dundas Square

The Hermant Building at 19 Dundas Square, designed by Bond & Smith Architects in 1913, is an early and excellent surviving example of terracotta cladding in Toronto. When it was completed, this 10-storey building was the tallest in the city, and a significant landmark. The Hermant Building originally housed the headquarters of Imperial Optical which at...

Image of 21 Dundas Square Hermant Building: 21 Dundas Square

The Hermant Building at 21 Dundas Square was designed by Benjamin Brown in 1929. Benjamin Brown is historically significant as the first practicing Jewish architect in Toronto. The 15-storey art-deco-inspired building is a significant landmark at Dundas Square. As part of a 40-storey mixed-use redevelopment designed by Diamond Schmidt, ERA has been working as heritage...

Summerhill House

This project involved the extensive interior renovation and façade restoration of a historic John Wilson Siddall house in Toronto. ERA worked with Croma Design to improve the performance of the building’s envelope, redesign the house’s floor plan and interiors, and preserve select elements such as the original living room and staircase hall. The scope of work...

111 Richmond St. W.

ERA worked with WZMH Architects to rejuvenate 111 Richmond St. West, one of Toronto’s few intact examples of high-quality 1950s office building design, making this an important example of post-war modernist restoration. The 15-storey building was designed by the legendary British emigré modernist architect Peter Dickinson and engineer Morden Yolles. ERA’s restoration work brought back...

Casey House Ramp: 9 Huntley St.

ERA was engaged to develop a new access ramp for Casey House: 9 Huntley St., to replace a previous ramp that was deteriorating, difficult to use, and which did not satisfy new Ontario Building Code regulations. Our challenge was to provide a design as light and unobtrusive as possible, while still accommodating the gentle slope...

Sisters of St. Joseph: Taylor House

This building, sited on the east bank of Toronto’s Don River, was constructed in 1885 for John F. Taylor, founder of the Don Valley Brick Works. The building was designed in the Queen Anne style by architect D.B. Dick, and is constructed from local brick on a stone base. Over many years of use, the...

St James’ Cathedral

Located in downtown Toronto, St. James’ Cathedral is the city’s oldest Anglican church and a fine example of Gothic Revival architecture. The main body of the Church was completed in 1856 to the designs of Fredrick Cumberland; the porches and tower spire were added by William Storm in 1875, and were designed to compliment the...

Bay Adelaide Centre

In the 1840s, a row of buildings known as the Elgin Block was constructed along Yonge Street. The block’s tenants over the next century included tailors, tanners, and tobacconists. Holt Renfrew and Company extensively renovated one of the buildings and operated in this location from 1910 until the 1950s. While much of the Elgin Block...

The Grange

The oldest remaining brick house in Toronto, the Grange is a fine example of Georgian architecture, with bricks likely made onsite from local clay. It features a stone portico; a low-hipped roof with a central circular light; double-hung windows with brick lintels and louvered wooden shutters; and a front entrance with moulded reveal, semi-circular fanlight,...

Recent Projects

University Commons, University of Alberta University of Alberta
Edmonton
Sturgeon Bay Cottage Private client
Point au Baril, Ontario