ERA Architects

Home on the range

Scott recently completed a kitchen renovation for a private home in Cabbagetown. Centred around a six burner Wolf range, the space was just wide enough to accommodate a galley format with two runs of extra deep counters, lit by new double hung Kolbe and Kolbe windows.

More photos after the jump..

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Picton Main Street

Meandering this morning through the Archives of the Ontario  I came across these  great pictures of Picton’s Main Street at the turn of the century.

Parade (1905)

H. B. Wright & Co. storefront (between 1898-1920)

Picton Methodist Church and tourist office (between 1898 and 1920)

Download North York’s Modernist Architecture Revisited

Download the full 2010 edition of North York’s Modernist Architecture Revisited in PDF format.  A hard-copy of this booklet was made available at the November 9th, 2010 North York Modernist Architecture Forum.

North York’s Modernist Architecture Revisited is an extension of and complements ERA’s 2009 reprinting of the original 1997 report and inventory.  It includes current photographs of over 200 buildings from the original inventory plus additional notable buildings built between 1945 and 1981 in North York.  Also included is a proposed heritage policy strategy, biographies of several prominent architects, and an essay on North York’s modernist beginnings.

Please note that North York’s Modernist Architecture Revisited includes over 300 photographs, and the PDF is quite large.  At 32mb, the file may take some time to download.

Hidden Architectural Gems

As part of our exploration of the County and surrounding areas, we recently had the opportunity to visit a few true architectural gems – Otto Roger’s artist studio by architect Siamak Hariri and the Bata Residence (in Batawa) by architect John B. Parkin.

The Bata residence (currently being documented by Carleton University students) is a remarkable and well preserved example of Parkin’s residential work.  Located up on the hill, the residence boats an incredible view overlooking the Town of Batawa.  And though it is modest in size, it is clear that every detail was considered.  A few memorable attributes include the family shoe closet (but of course), the bathroom colours, and the custom designed dining table.

The artist studio by Hariri was another fantastic discovery.  Here we found a building, again modest and finely articulated, quietly nestled into the woods.  But what was breath-taking was how the intimacy with nature extended into the studio with the light and the glow of the autumn coloured leaves.

Both these visits, unique and inspiring in their own ways, confirmed to me there is indeed a special ‘sense of place’ here.  And that it is exemplified not just in our loyalist building stock, but also in our more recent architectural contributions.

 

Toronto Densities Map now available for download

Developed for ERA’s People Per Hectare installation at Harbourfront last fall, this gigantic map compares densities across a sample of Toronto neighbourhoods.  Using familiar local examples, it was developed to illustrate the very abstract concept of a quantitative density value – and to question what exactly that value might tell us about neighbourhood livability.  Copies of the map have been in constant demand by visitors to both the exhibition and to our offices, where it has found a permanent home.

Now you too can download the map and print your very own copy – in either 3″x6″ postcard, 11″x17″ tabloid, or 36″x18″ poster size.

Dispatchwork

Though perhaps not exactly in-line with the Ministry of Culture’s Ontario Heritage Tool Kit procedures or the guidelines set forth in the Burra Charter, these temporary masonry repairs in Bocchignano, Italy are a series of wonderfully playful gestures.



photographs via Jan Vormann

ps: How do you write a spec for Lego?

After you left, they took it apart

Buffalo photographer Chris Mottalini has produced an astoundingly beautiful and poignant set of images from now-demolished Paul Rudolph homes in Connecticut, Rhode Island, and Florida. The images speak for themselves:

In Chris’ own words:

My intent was to pay homage to Paul Rudolph and his work, as well as the more abstract and elusive qualities of architecture – decay, destruction, loss, and fragility.

Many more images from the project can be found at Chris Mottalini’s website.

Evergreen Brick Works

Construction and conservation work are ongoing down at the Evergreen Brick Works, and the project has recently been attracting a good deal of attention. The Toronto Star reports today that National Geographic Traveler named Evergreen Brick Works a Top 10 destination for sustainable travel, and ERA was present for the recent royal site visit from HRH The Prince of Wales.


The Prince gives the Brick Works Farmers’ Market produce the Royal review.

ERA is currently working to stabilize the south east corner of Building 11, which will be adjacent to the new site entrance and welcome centre.


Building 11, as it currently stands

The floors between building 14 and 15 have been excavated and prep work is underway for the new greenways.

ERA is also working with Shawn Selway, of Pragmata Historic Machinery Conservation, to develop a conservation strategy and interpretation of the Martin A. Brick Machine.



The Martin A. Brick Press

Work is ongoing, so check back soon for further updates…

Respectful Rehabilitation

This past year ERA Principal Michael McClelland was a guest lecturer at Simon Fraser University. His lectures on Respectful Rehabilitation included “Rehabilitation and New Design – The Royal Ontario Museum and the Art Gallery of Ontario” and “Balancing Heritage Conservation in the Private Sector: A Case Study of the Distillery District in Toronto”. They can now be viewed online at www.sfu.ca/city/city_pgm_videos.htm