ERA Architects

ACO NextGen Charrette on Mill St.

On Saturday, Sept 14, ERA’s Shannon Clayton and the Architectural Conservancy’s NextGen Group held their second annual Design Charrette in Toronto. The all-day event took place at the Parliament Interpretive Center (265 Front St. E).

Twenty-eight participants worked in five teams to develop schemes for an underutilized site along Mill St. between Trinity and Parliament St. The teams were made up of students and emerging professionals in the fields of architecture, planning, environmental design, and heritage. Continue reading…

Transformative potential of Tower Renewal: Globe & Mail

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Alex Bozikovic, Toronto-based writer on architecture and design, recently provided an update on Tower Renewal efforts in the GTA. The article describes the uniquely Canadian and Torontonian inventory of high-rise post-war tower apartment neighbourhoods, and recent efforts by local architects, not-for-profits, and city departments to rethink these neighbourhoods. With aging buildings in need of maintenance and energy efficiency upgrades, and zoning laws that see neighbourhoods underserved and undernourished, Toronto is ready for some practical changes.

Bozikovic is optimistic: By his estimation, the Tower Renewal project can truly transform Toronto for the better.

For the full article, which features several quotations from ERA’s Graeme Stewart, please see “Toronto hopes to revitalize its many postwar highrises” in the Globe & Mail.

Shipbuilding in NFLD: a book

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ERA’s Philip Evans and grandfather Calvin Evans are about to launch Master Shipbuilders of Newfoundland and Labrador, Vol I, a detailed account of one of maritime Canada’s oldest traditions. The book, published by Breakwater Books, will be launched at 3:30 on Sat. Sept. 14 at the St. John’s Chapters. Philip and Calvin Evans will be present for an informal discussion and Q&A. Continue reading…

Slabs vs. points

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A new article in Satellite Magazine on Toronto Towers by ERA’s Graeme Stewart, Josh Thorpe, and Michael McClelland.

The article compares Toronto’s two high-rise housing booms, which have generated housing in volume and distribution unlike anywhere else in North America: first, the suburban tower boom in Toronto’s post-war period, and next the contentious condo boom of recent years. Continue reading…