ERA Architects

Government Conference Centre: Progress on Heritage Interiors

The heritage interiors and finishes are coming to life at the Government Conference Centre (GCC) in Ottawa. Since the new year, the scaffolding has come down in the General Waiting Room (GWR, as shown here), revealing the rehabilitated suspended ceiling in its entirety and the recently painted imitation travertine wall finishes.

The GWR is an elaborate and significant interior space, part of the formal processional route bringing visitors through the building to some of its grandest interiors. As a visitor enters through the Rideau Entrance Lobby, down the grand stair, they find themselves here: viewing the building’s Beaux-Arts features evident in its monumental use of classical forms such as the columns, entablatures, pilasters, arches and vaults.

The GCC Rehabilitation Project is transforming the former Ottawa Union Station into an Interim Senate Facility for ten years, after which it will revert back to its role as the GCC. The rehabilitation aims to reveal the historical elements of the building that were concealed over time, such as its theatrical qualities and rich palette of materials.

ERA Architects is working as the heritage architects with Diamond Schmitt/KWC Architects in Joint Venture.

Photos courtesy of ERA Architects.

Our Expanding Leadership Team

As ERA continues to grow and evolve, ERA’s executive and associate team is thrilled to announce the appointment of seven new associates: Alexis Cohen, Dan Eylon, Samantha Irvine, Shelley Ludman, Jordan Molnar, Annie Pelletier, and Janice Quieta.

We’re very pleased to recognize the leadership of these new associates and their commitment to ERA’s core values. We also appreciate the energy they bring to their work, their individual perspectives on city-building and cultural planning, and the professional expertise they offer our clients and their colleagues at ERA.

Congratulations to all!

 

Alexis Cohen is trained as an architectural historian and brings her research background to a range of heritage planning projects at ERA. She works collaboratively with complex project teams using historical research and analysis to inform the conservation of evolving urban environments.

 

Annie Pelletier possesses nearly a decade of work experience on projects between New York and Toronto, managing project types from residential to institutional, on a mixture of new-build, adaptive re-use, extensions and conservation work.

 

Dan Eylon collaborates with differing levels of government, engaging in a broad range of conservation and planning projects. He is driven to make a meaningful contribution to the quality of urban development and heritage resource management.

 

Janice Quieta has studied and worked in Toronto, Halifax, Dusseldorf, and Koln and participated in a number of national and international design competitions in Canada and Germany. She is interested in sustainable technology at the intersection of new and existing materials.

 

Jordan Molnar’s project experience is both broad and deep, including heritage conservation, adaptive-reuse, and renovations/additions. He compliments his architecture portfolio with interests in small community development through Culture of Outports and Small, participating in community feasibility studies, community workshops and design-build projects.

 

Samantha Irvine oversees projects that impact culturally significant buildings, neighbourhoods and landscapes. She is committed to creating opportunities for historic buildings to enrich urban life. Her perspective is informed by the uncommon combination of a legal background and experience in both heritage conservation and community planning.

 

Shelley Ludman has been involved in significant conservation and adaptive re-use projects within the cities of Montreal and Toronto, including additions to existing heritage designated properties, drawing inspiration from existing buildings and their surrounding context.

Kensington Market Lofts Presents a Gateway of Colour to the Neighbourhood

The scaffolding has finally come down to reveal the brilliant collection of 17 colours featured on the east façade of the Kensington Market Lofts building, a public art piece created by notable local artist and area resident An Te Lui! Inspired by the culturally-diverse public realm in which it is located, it as a gateway to the neighbourhood.

Located at 160 Baldwin Street, the Kensington Market Lofts was built in 1952 by George Brown College to house their technical school, was and attached to an older red brick school building dating from 1923. The new addition was clad in glazed yellow terra-cotta blocks, which over time had begun to allow water to infiltrate its steel support structure. ERA has worked with the condo board on a long-term multi-stage revitalization of the buildings, including interior finish upgrades and wayfinding, as well as developing an extensive program of façade remediation.

It was determined that the east façade was at particular risk of future infiltration, and that a robust over cladding strategy would be required to protect the steel structure once remediated. Simultaneously the remaining terracotta blocks could be salvaged for use in preserving the original features of the building on the remaining facades. In addition to its functional necessity, ERA and the condo board viewed the proposed over cladding as a unique opportunity for the building to contribute to the public realm, and asked An Te Liu to develop a pattern that could speak to the building’s important context within Kensington Market.

An Te Liu’s concept for the colour configuration was based a pattern depicting the neighbourhood’s historic diversity, the distribution of the colours being drawn from an analysis of the percentage of those present in the world’s national flags. The significance of the approach is that the material sits comfortably within its bohemian context as it complements the existing vibrant-coloured awnings, shops and graffiti that energize the streetscape. The project faces one of Toronto’s most important thoroughfares, providing a landmark that will invite people into the market at one of its primary entrances. It is a physical manifestation and embodiment of the eclectic spirit and energy of the market.

Congratulations to ERA’s project team: Graeme Stewart, Max Berg, and Leah Gibling!

To access the recent Globe and mail article on this project by David LeBlanc, click here.
To access recent CODAmagazine coverage on this project, click here.

Images by An Te Liu and Vik Pahwa.