ERA Architects

ERA Architects is Thrilled to Welcome David Winterton Back to the Team as Our Newest Associate

David Winterton is excited to return to Toronto and ERA Architects after 11 ½ years working and learning in the storied New York firm of Robert A. M. Stern Architects.

There he served as a designer for Fifteen Central Park West, an 890,000 square foot, two-tower residential project occupying a full city block along Central Park in New York City; 50 Connaught Road, an office building in Hong Kong; The Yards, a new mixed-use riverfront neighborhood on the former grounds of the Washington Navy Yard Annex in Washington, DC; Projet Viger, a mixed-use development in Montreal; and a private residence in New Jersey. Mr. Winterton was Project Manager for the Brompton, a 300,000-square-foot residential tower on New York City’s Upper East Side; a private residence in Singapore; and two villa enclave projects in Hong Kong. David was also Project Architect for two condominium towers in Vancouver and a villa in Grunewald Berlin.

Prior to his time in New York David worked at ERA Architects on various historic preservation projects including the Massey Harris Loft conversion and various Heritage Conservation District Studies. Because of his keen interest in the preservation and improvement of the public realm he founded the Friends of Allan Gardens in 1999, a group formed to advocate for the restoration of the Palmhouse and grounds of one of Toronto’s oldest parks, and on whose board of directors he currently serves.

David received his Bachelor of Architecture degree from the University of Toronto and his Master of Architecture degree from McGill University. He is a registered architect in the State of New York, a LEED Accredited Professional, and a member of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada. His research on Toronto’s rich early 20th century architecture and architects led to the publication of his essay, “Toronto’s Edwardian Skyscraper Row,” in the Journal of the Society for the Study of Architecture in Canada. He is eager to further this research and hopes to foster a greater appreciation for the fascinating story of the evolution of architecture in Toronto.

For a sampling of David’s past work with RAMSA, click here.